Haldimand County unveils new aerial truck, donates unused medical equipment to Ukraine

On Tuesday, June 21, 2022, the county’s new, state-of-the art aerial truck made a stop out front of the Haldimand County Administration Building. Emergency Services staff provided Council with a tour of the new vehicle and showcased surplus PPE/medical supplies that will be donated to Ukraine.

The new aerial truck was custom-built for Haldimand’s specific needs and will be permanently stationed in Caledonia.

It is equipped with a 107-foot extension ladder that will allow firefighters to get on top of emergencies in more densely populated areas of west Haldimand and enhance their ability to fight fires in tall structures (including barns).

Combined with aerial trucks in Jarvis and Dunnville, the new vehicle will enable the Fire Department to respond with an aerial truck anywhere in the county within ten minutes.

In tandem with Council’s tour of the new truck, Emergency Services staff revealed some of the surplus medical equipment that is being donated to Ukraine. Staff worked to identify key supply needs and ‘matches’ with some of the county’s surplus items.

“The surplus equipment – which includes medical bags, stair chairs and spinal boards – would normally go on the GovDeals.ca auction site and generate a small profit for the County,” said Jason Gallagher, Haldimand County’s Fire Chief and Manager of Emergency Services.

“The benefit of donating these extra supplies where they’re desperately needed in Ukraine, far outweighs any revenue benefit we would receive. I am proud of our team for coordinating this initiative and know that it will make an impact,” Gallagher continued.

The new aerial truck will go into service in July and medical supplies will be shipped to Ukraine later this month.

For more information about Haldimand County Emergency Services programs and services, visit HaldimandCounty.ca or follow along on Twitter or Instagram (@HaldEmerg).

Haldimand County Fire Department aerial truck parked out front of the County administration building with extension ladder fully extended.

Above: Haldimand County’s new aerial truck.

Below: Unused medical equipment that will be donated to Ukraine.

Unused medial equipment displayed in front of the County administration building that will be donated to Ukraine.

Collaboration Between Social Services and Community Paramedics Serves to provide Street Outreach to Vulnerable Residents

Haldimand-Norfolk Housing and Homelessness Prevention services has teamed up with the community paramedic programs in both Haldimand and Norfolk to provide street outreach and housing-related follow-up support to assist people who are experiencing homelessness. 

A new collaboration between community paramedics in both counties and specialized outreach workers reduces barriers to care faced by vulnerable, underserved, and hard-to-reach residents. The goal is to connect people to services they may require, including housing and health care.  

“We recognized this as an opportunity to be proactive and meet people where they are, making the services more accessible and responsive,” said Louise Lovell, program manager for Haldimand-Norfolk Homeless Prevention Services. “Combining a social services staff member and a community paramedic offers a wider range of services to more people.”  

Sarah Page, chief of Norfolk Paramedic Services, and Jason Gallagher, fire chief and manager of Haldimand Paramedic Services, both expressed praise for this partnership. “Expanding our community paramedicine programs to provide access across our counties to those in need of care outside our normal health care system is what we are striving to accomplish,” said Sarah Page. “Both Chief Gallagher and I recognize that this partnership with Haldimand-Norfolk Social Services highlights our regions’ ability to collaborate and find innovative solutions in rural areas for health care delivery and access to support.”

The pilot began early in 2022 and is expected to continue through the end of the year. The teams are deployed in Haldimand on Tuesdays and Norfolk on Wednesdays. Members of the general public or agencies that have clientele that might be served by a visit can call the following numbers: in Norfolk: 519-426-6170 or 519-582-3579 or in Haldimand: 905-318-6623 at Ext. 3134 and a team can be deployed.  Callers are asked to provide a specific location or a description of where they have seen people. 

Health & Social Services logo

Faces of Paramedicine Week; Spotlight on Haldimand County’s Specialty Paramedic Program

Haldimand County’s Paramedic Specialty Programs are essential in delivering specialized in-home service through community outreach programs while offering mobility in care with our Bike Medic Program. These personalized programs keep our community healthy and provide specific care to our residents based on their needs. One of its initiatives is to incorporate animal therapy into the care of clients.

The Community Paramedic Wellness Dog Program brings a deeper connection and support to our existing Community Paramedic Programs. The CP Wellness Dogs can be used in home visits, wellness clinics, and community outreach programs. Animal therapy has long been proven to lower stress, improve feelings of wellbeing, support people through difficult situations, and bring happiness to those they visit.

The CP Wellness Dogs Program is fortunate to have several families and businesses generously donate their suitable dogs for use in this program. If successful in the evaluation and training process, these dogs will be partnered with a Community Paramedic Handler to improve the health and wellness of the people they are visiting.

Haldimand County also has a Bike Paramedic Program that deploys paramedics on bicycles at community events, fairs, and festivals. The Bike Medic program is looking forward to another successful year, quickly responding to patients and providing initial emergency care until an ambulance arrives. The Bike Medics will be attending many events throughout the county; keep an eye out for them during the spring and summer festival season.

The Haldimand County Paramedic Program is diversifying its services to meet the needs of our residents through localized and specialized care. Our Community Paramedic Wellness Dogs Program is making strides to connect people with animals to promote overall wellbeing. Whereas our Bike Medics are actively in the community to ensure you remain safe as summer activities resume. Over the next few months, keep an eye on our Paramedic Speciality Programs tailoring care to meet your needs.

Emergency Preparedness Week 2022 – Be Ready for Anything!

Across Canada, Emergency Preparedness Week, May 1-7, 2022, asks Canadians to Be Ready for Anything! and take action to prepare for emergencies. Extreme weather is a prime example of a hazard becoming more common, which may severely impact communities. For that reason, each resident must be ready for anything.

All municipalities plan for big emergencies. Haldimand County Emergency Services works with the local agencies to prepare for these events to ensure minimal disruption to municipal services. Another component of emergency planning is promoting individual responsibility during an emergency.

Emergency Preparedness Week is a national program that encourages Canadians to think about hazards and risks in their area and consider how they can remain safe for up to three days. This may be as simple as learning where to get information during an emergency or creating a 72-hour Emergency Kit with items found in your home.

“It is crucial to Emergency Services that everyone be able to take care of themselves and their family for up to 3 days. We are stronger together when working towards the common goal of community safety,” said Kim Payne, Coordinator of Emergency Management, regarding EP Week’s importance.

Haldimand County Emergency Services also recommends that each household takes this week to develop or review their Home Emergency Plan. Planning at all levels allows better use of resources to limit the impact of an emergency, keeping your family’s safety a top priority.

More information will be available at Haldimand County Administration Building, 53 Thorburn Street, Cayuga, ON (May 1- 7, 2022) or on the Haldimand County Website. Also, visit Public Safety Canada Website for a resource toolkit to get you started.

A Reminder of Haldimand County’s Recreational and Non-recreational Fire By-Laws

The arrival of warmer weather has sparked an uptick in recreational and non-recreational fires in Haldimand County.  The Haldimand County Fire Department would like to remind all residents of our Open Air Burn By-law.  We kindly ask for everyone’s cooperation to ensure that all outdoor fires are safe and controlled.

Haldimand County does allow small fires (recreational) in all areas without a permit as long as the fire meets all of the regulations found in the Open Air Burn By-law.  Things to remember when having a fire on your property are:

  • The fire is contained and supervised at all times.
  • Recreational fires must be at least 10 meters from buildings and structures.
  • A means of extinguishing the fire must be available.
  • Measures must be in place, so no one is adversely affected by the smoke and odours from your fire.

However, Haldimand County only permits Non-recreational fires in specific regions.  As a result, you must acquire a burn permit available on the Haldimand County Website.  Non-recreational fires must meet all of the regulations set out in the by-law.

These regulations include:

  • Non-recreational fires must remain under supervision at all times.
  • Fires must be contained to an area not exceeding 6 meters by 6 meters.
  • Non-recreational fires must be 60 meters from all buildings, roadways and anything combustible.

Conducting Open-air fires that are not in line with Haldimand County’s by-law presents potential safety hazards.  Anyone running an open-air fire that violates the by-law is subject to fines, provincial prosecution and recovery of costs required to respond to and extinguish the fire.

If you have further questions regarding Haldimand County’s Open Air Burn By-law or our Burn Permit, please reach out to Haldimand County Emergency Services at (905) 318-5932, extension 6230.

 

911 Basics

Haldimand County Paramedic Services comprises dedicated professionals who work hard to guarantee emergency care for those in need.  We ask all residents to assist us by reviewing when it is appropriate to call 911.

What is 911

911 is a central dispatch for emergency services.  This service allows for all emergency services to be deployed to assure those first responders can deliver emergency services quickly and efficiently.

When to call 911

Knowing when to call 911 can be a difficult decision.  Assessing your situation will make sure that emergency services are available when needed.  Do not hesitate to contact them for immediate help if you are experiencing:

  • Medical emergencies, like chest pain or difficulty breathing,
  • A direct threat to life,
  • An uncontrolled or an uncontained fire.

What happens when you call 911

A 911 dispatcher will answer and ask if you need police, fire or ambulance.  Before calling, be sure to assess your situation to give the dispatcher a complete picture of the circumstances you are experiencing.  That way, they can arrange for the appropriate assistance.

With many people relying on mobile devices, you may need to provide exact location details.  Cell phones do not give the dispatcher’s precise address, and they will only see your general location.  Be prepared to give an address or an intersection.  Other critical information that may be necessary are:

  • Apartment number and entry code,
  • Landmarks,
  • Any obstacles that may prevent entry,
  • Language barriers that could require accommodation.

Be sure to stay on the line to let the 911 dispatcher will let you know when to hang up.

Questions to ask yourself:

Is a person hurt or in danger?

  • Do not hesitate to call 911 if there is difficulty breathing, uncontrolled bleeding, or chest pain.

Is there an emergency where a law enforcement officer, firefighter or medical help is needed?

  • If you are witnessing an assault, or think a driver is impaired, do not intervene and call 911 immediately.

Are there alternative numbers to call to help you assess your situation?

  • There are services available to assist you in determining your required level of care. Telehealth, which offers free medical advice over the phone, or 211 Ontario, a Community and Social Services helpline, can guide you.

Are you still unsure? 

  • Go ahead and call 911.  The call taker will then determine if emergency assistance is needed.

IMPORTANT NUMBERS TO CALL

Telehealth Ontario:

Toll-free: 1-866-797-0000

Toll-free TTY:1-866-797-0007

211 Ontario:

www.211ontario.ca

Call: 2-1-1

Toll-free: 1-877-330-3213

TTY: 1-844-483-9835

Call 1-(888)-310-1122

File a report online on the O.P.P. website

A Decision Tree Chart for calling 911

 

Haldimand County, agricultural community celebrate installation of first Farm 911 sign

Earlier this month, Haldimand County and the local agriculture community celebrated the installation of the first Farm 911 sign.

Individuals associated with the farm 911 Emily Project stand beside a newly installed yellow Farm 911 sign. From left to right:rogram sponsors Darcy Johnson (Erie Mutual), Richard Blyleven (Christian Farmers Federation of Ontario local chapter), and Councillor John Metcalfe (Council representative for Haldimand County’s Agriculture Advisory Committee). Henk Lise is also the Chair of Haldimand County’s Agriculture Advisory Committee and President of the Haldimand Federation of Agriculture.

Property owners Henk and Jackie Lise celebrated this initiative alongside program sponsors Darcy Johnson (Erie Mutual), Richard Blyleven (Christian Farmers Federation of Ontario local chapter), and Councillor John Metcalfe (Council representative for Haldimand County’s Agriculture Advisory Committee). Henk Lise is also the Chair of Haldimand County’s Agriculture Advisory Committee and President of the Haldimand Federation of Agriculture.

The Farm 911 Emily Project offers owners of rural, agricultural land the opportunity to purchase 911 signage for their farm entrances to help first responders locate individuals/incidents in an emergency.

Through this program, properties will be identified by yellow and black signs to distinguish between vacant properties and properties with dwellings. This is so first responders are aware the incident they are called to may not be tied to a home or farm building. This project will operate on a voluntary basis for existing vacant farm entrances.

“This program is such an important initiative as it helps promote on farm safety. By installing these signs property owners will improve Haldimand County’s Emergency Services ability to locate on farm accidents, with the objective of preventing tragedies in the farming community,” remarked Henk Lise, Chair of Haldimand County’s Agriculture Advisory Committee.

It is anticipated that sponsorships received from Erie Mutual Insurance, the local Christian Farmers Federation of Ontario and Haldimand Federation of Agriculture will cover the costs of 35 signs (first come, first serve) for 2021 and potentially 55 signs for 2022.

If funding is fully subscribed to, successful applicants will be required to pay a fee of $109.61 (2021 fee) which is to be submitted along with their application). The application will be reviewed by staff and if no concerns are identified, a new civic address will be issued.

Individuals who wish to participate are encouraged to submit an application form available online at HaldimandCounty.ca/The-Farm-911-Emily-Project or contact Planning@HaldimandCounty.on.ca for additional information.

Farm 911 Emily Project officially launched in Haldimand

Haldimand County is pleased to announce the launch of the Farm 911 Emily Project civic addressing initiative.

The program offers owners of rural, agricultural land the opportunity to purchase 911 signage for their farm entrances to help first responders locate individuals/incidents in an emergency.

The Farm 911 Emily Project is inspired by Emily Trudeau, who tragically passed away after being involved in a farm accident in Hastings County, Ontario, where first responders had difficulties finding her location.

“This program will assist first responders in identifying the site of a medical or rescue incident more efficiently. When a farm incident occurs it can take first responders longer to locate the property if there is no civic address,” said Jason Gallagher, Haldimand’s Manager of Emergency Services and Fire Chief.

“Although we have not had any local tragedies due to an inability to find an incident on vacant property, we hope these measures will ensure we continue on this course,” Gallagher added.

Haldimand County would like to acknowledge the Haldimand County Agricultural Advisory Committee and the Haldimand Federation of Agriculture (HFA) for bringing this program to the attention of Council for the benefit of agricultural property owners.

In addition, Haldimand County is pleased to partner with Erie Mutual Insurance Company and the Christian Farmers Federation of Ontario (local chapter) who have provided sponsorship funds to cover the costs of 35 signs (first come, first serve) for 2021.

This project will operate on a voluntary basis for existing vacant farm entrances.

Individuals who wish to participate are encouraged to submit an application form available online at HaldimandCounty.Ca/The-Farm-911-Emily-Project or contact planning@HaldimandCounty.on.ca for additional information.

If funding is fully subscribed to, successful applicants will be required to pay a fee of $109.61* which is to be submitted along with their application (*2021 fee).

The application will be reviewed by staff and if no concerns are identified, a new civic address will be issued.

Through this program, properties will be identified by yellow and black signs to distinguish between vacant properties and properties with dwellings. This is so first responders are aware the incident they are called to may not be tied to a home or farm building.

Haldimand County Council Opposes Use of Haldibrook Road for City of Hamilton’s Truck Route Master Plan

At the Council meeting held on June 28, 2021, Haldimand County Council passed the following resolution:

THAT Haldimand County Council has reviewed the City of Hamilton’s draft recommended Truck Route Master Plan as outlined in the correspondence from the City of Hamilton sent on June 14, 2021;

AND THAT given the overwhelming public opposition, lack of adequate infrastructure to support truck traffic and the existence of a designated truck route in close proximity, Haldimand County Council is strongly opposed to Haldibrook Road being included as a proposed truck route in the City of Hamilton’s Truck Route Master Plan.

Notice of the passing of this resolution will be sent to the City of Hamilton.

The City of Hamilton is currently undertaking a comprehensive review of their Truck Route Master Plan. More information regarding the project, including how residents can participate and provide comments, can be found at engage.hamilton.ca/trmp

Second Public Education Meeting Set For Lake Erie Shoreline Hazard Mapping And Risk Assessment Study

In 2018, Haldimand County, the Grand River Conservation Authority (GRCA), Long Point Region Conservation Authority (LPRCA) and the Niagara Peninsula Conservation Authority (NPCA) initiated a study to update the Lake Erie shoreline flood, erosion and dynamic beach hazard mapping.

The majority of the work to update the hazard mapping to current mapping and technical standards is now complete. The second of two Public Education Centres (PEC) is scheduled to take place on Saturday, September 21, 2019 from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. at the Selkirk Centennial Community Centre (34 Main Street West, Selkirk). The first PEC took place in September 2018.

The PEC will follow an open house format. There will be no formal presentations; however, the session will provide an opportunity for landowners and members of the public to learn about the findings of the study, as well as contribute their knowledge of local conditions. County and Conservation Authority staff will be available to answer questions and all members of the public interested in the project are welcome to attend.

This is a technical study to update hazard mapping. Updates to conservation authority shoreline management plans or policies, Haldimand County’s Emergency Response Plan and Official Plan are outside the scope of this project.

The PECs for this project will meet the requirements for public consultation for any resulting amendments to regulated area mapping of Ontario Regulations 150/06, 155/06 and 178/06 made under the Conservation Authorities Act.

Consistent hazard mapping across conservation authority jurisdictions is required to support land use planning and permitting decisions in at-risk communities and flood and erosion-related response and mitigation planning. Current shoreline hazard mapping for the County within LPRCA and GRCA jurisdictions was prepared in the late 1980s – early 1990s, while the mapping within the NPCA jurisdiction was updated in 2010.

The project will also update municipal risk assessment information for shoreline flooding, including inventorying at-risk infrastructure and estimating damage potential. It is anticipated the project will be completed by early 2020.

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